All posts by David

Access to the Reserve

The contractor has now finished work on the main car park which is now re-opened. As well as levelling the car park and adding a soak away to improve drainage the access path to the reserve has been improved. The path is now smoother, wider and has a more even gradient making it safer to access and exit the reserve. Please do still take care on this slope and the many others on the reserve. The subtle hint to the risks of visiting the reserve is in the name!

Also note that livestock will soon be present again for the autumn and winter grazing regime. Please look out for the notices and signs and take particular care when walking your dog(s) to keep them under close control at all times.

Car Park Closure

 
The main car park at the Hills & Holes will be closed for essential maintenance from Mon 6 Aug-Fri 10 Aug inclusive.  The closure is for safety reasons and to allow for essential maintenance to be carried out on the car park, including re buttressing of the cattle grid, addition of a soak away to avoid flooding and regrading of the pathway from the MCP to the reserve.  The smaller car parks on Wittering Road and Walcott Road will remain open.
 
Contractors have also started taking down the field perimeter fence with the intention of fully replacing it. 
 

 When any maintenance work is taking place, please take extra care in the area and note any signs and verbal instructions from the contractors or Natural England staff.

Natural England apologies for any inconvenience caused and thanks you for your patience during this period.  Any queries can addressed to reserve warden steven.bighi@naturalengland.org.uk

Pasque Flowers and Cowslips have provided a fantastic display this year

Whilst the Pasque Flowers and Cowslips are coming to an end and the Early Purple Orchid display is peaking, it is still not too late to enjoy them and you will not be the only ones. As illustrated in the photo kindly provided by Anna R. the insects are now busy on the reserve this also includes Green Hairstreak butterflies.

The first Man Orchid spike has been reported so the succession of plants and flowers to see continues and this activity will continue to build over the coming months.The number of Mistle thrushes seen and heard on the reserve this season seem particularly high and the summer warblers are in good voice and backed by Skylarks singing above the fields to the west of the reserve boundary.

Hopefully we will see the return of the sunshine in the next few days to add to the pleasure of a walk round this very special place.

As always we ask that you take care on the reserve and if you bring a four legged friend you keep it under control and clear up after them  using the bags and bins provided.

Natural England have been in touch with the police regarding the number of break ins to cars in the main car park so please do take care not to leave any valuables on display when leaving your car.

 

Glow worm walk

On the evening of Wednesday 27th June 9.30pm Natural England will be leading a glow worm walk on the reserve.

Meeting at the main car park

A night-time ramble to discover the hidden world of this mysterious insect with Reserve Manager Tim Starsmore-Sutton

As numbers are limited on night walks,  please ring 07798 645935 for details and to book a place.

Spring is confirmed on the reserve

At the guided walk yesterday the presence of the sunshine and the first Pasque flowers confirmed that spring has finally arrived. The cowslips are slowly developing what looks like it could be an impressive display this year and the Early Purple Orchids are appearing in significant numbers. The call of a Willow Warbler, a Mistle Thrush filling the air with its song and both Blue and Great Tits spotted with nesting material all show that everything is heading in the right direction. In the afternoon the appearance of Brimstone, Peacock and Small Tortoiseshell butterflies added to the encouraging signs and despite a slight step backwards with extensive cloud cover the warmer temperatures today and forecast for the rest of the week means we can expect rapid developments across the reserve.

First signs of spring on the reserve

At last a few days without snow and some colour has appeared on the limestone grassland. The first patch of violets have quickly come in to flower. Also the early orchids have started to bravely put out some leaves, I hope they do not regret it with the forecast showing potential of some snow next weekend! The cowslips are even trying to catch up, this time last year they were in full bloom across the reserve now it is still hunt the emerging plants.

The work of the N.E. team and volunteers has certainly cleared out the old windmill car park scrub area and opened up the views from the centre of the reserve into compartment 4 (south east quarter).

One interesting side effect is this weeping Silver Birch stump. Last week an icicle was present down the side and this weekend it is just streaming sap.

Working Party on the Reserve Monday 19th February

With the sheep having done an excellent job over the winter months removing some of the longer and tougher grasses, therefore allowing the wild flowers to have less competition, it is now our turn. There is a Natural England led working party meeting on the reserve in the main car park 08:45- 9:00am on Monday 19th February. Please do join us for as little or as long as you can that morning to help clear some of the scrub so we can maintain the open limestone grassland and its rare wildflower population.

Plans to join with Langdyke Countryside Trust have moved ahead so please keep a look out for news of an exciting introductory event on 14th April.

Annual General Meeting on 29th November

This year’s AGM will be held at Barnack Village Hall on Wednesday 29th November from 7:30pm.  As well as the usual business meeting and displays of information  there will be an illustrated talk on the Langdyke Trust by Richard Astle. This is an important meeting for the future of the Friends of Barnack Hills and Holes so please do attend and help establish what we do in 2018.

I look forward to seeing you there.

Opportunity to help maintain the rich flora on the reserve

With the sheep now present on the reserve it is the time of year when we can lend them a hand with their vital task of managing the sward by removing more established scrub.

In the coming month there are three opportunities for you to help keep the reserve in good condition for the rarer flora which the reserve supports and provides such a wonderful spring and summer show of colour and interest.

On Sunday 24th September 10:00 to 14:00  and over the same time period on Wednesday 27th September the summer warden will be facilitating  working parties on the reserve to clear some of the smaller scrub starting to take over in many areas of the reserve. This will be a gentle and easy opportunity to cut back the many small hawthorn and turkey oak plants which have emerged over the past 12-24 months. Please feel free to join us for as long as you can on either or both days.

For those wanting to participate in more major scrub clearance then the Peterborough Conservation Volunteers will be on site on Sunday 10th September. Everyone is welcome to join them and lend a hand in clearing one of the more overgrown areas.

For more details or to let us know you will be coming then please e-mail: records@fbhh.org.uk.

Sheep now present on the Reserve

Barnack Hills and Holes National Nature Reserve is not only a local beauty-spot, it is both nationally and internationally important for its wealth of rare wild flowers. Natural England manages the Reserve for the benefit of its flora.

It is that time of year again when plans to introduce livestock onto the reserve are being made. Whilst I understand many of you, especially dog walkers (including me), find it frustrating, it is an essential part of the management of the reserve to control the sward and maintain the rich diversity of flora and fauna that we all enjoy. Without this grazing the rare orchids and pasque flowers that are highlights of many visits to the reserve will be significantly reduced, if not  lost completely, from the site and therefore the local area.

The original plan to use ponies this year to try to improve the effectiveness of the grazing has had to be abandoned due to concerns about loose dogs on the site. This is an annual issue with irresponsible dog owners allowing pets to chase and “worry” the sheep every year. Even if sheep escape uninjured, they may miscarry their lambs as a result. Dogs must be on short leads in the vicinity of livestock. Sheep worrying is a crime and we would encourage anyone seeing such behaviour to immediately report it to the police by calling 101 and also to Natural England by calling 07979873504 or e-mailing christopher.evans@naturalengland.org.uk.

We do thank all those responsible dog owners who always have their dogs on short leads where livestock is present and also keep their dogs under strict control on all parts of the reserve (whilst all attempts are made at keeping the sheep in one area and the signage up to date please be aware that sheep cannot read).  We do want to continue to allow free access to all parts of the reserve even when livestock are present and would encourage everyone to help us maintain this critically important reserve management tool (there really is no other practical option).