Tag Archives: featured

Glow worms on the reserve

Thanks to the sharp eyes of the seven people who attended the annual glow worm walk this year we not only found 13 female glow worms (plus three on the roadside on the way home) but also a male. The latter find proving that being able to glow in the dark does work to attract a mate!

If you were unable to tear yourselves away from the tennis (or the pub) last Friday evening then there are still a few more weeks when a  walk on the reserve on a warm evening after dark should be rewarded with one or more sightings of a small green LED like lights.

In daylight warm sunny days should be rewarded with numerous Marbled Whites. Apparently the first Chalkhill Blues of the season and the second flight of Brown Argus butterflies have also been sighted. Gatekeeper butterflies were relatively numerous on the latest transect walk at the end of last week along with high numbers of Meadow Browns, Ringlets and a few Skippers. Whilst the orchid season is coming to an end there are many more flowers in bloom so  a trip to the reserve at anytime in July always has something to discover.

Note also the signs that ponies are going to be used for the first time this year to graze and help manage the reserve. This activity is essential to help maintain and potentially improve the biodiversity. Their heavier trampling of the vegetation and greater stress resistance to the presence of people and particularly dogs (although please do ensure you keep them on leads in the area where the ponies are loose) should help ensure the autumn management aims are successfully achieved.

June update from the reserve

Whilst the Man Orchids and Fragrant Orchids are now starting to fade the Pyramidal Orchids are coming into bloom and a couple of Bee Orchids have been reported so the display of Orchids continues and is supplemented by more and more other flowers coming into full bloom.

The warm weather has also brought out more butterflies with largish numbers of Meadow Browns, some Ringlets and Skippers seen on the recent transect along with the first Marbled Whites. Numbers still seem lower than previous years but at least they are now in double figures!!  The transect was walked accompanied by a seemingly rather late  but persistent calling cuckoo.

The walk was not quite the spectacle of close up encounters with Swallowtails on the Norfolk Broads earlier in the week but you do not have to travel far to get close to nature. A “well earned” cup of coffee in the garden was rewarded on Tuesday by a Red  Kite descending into the neighbour’s garden, ten feet from where I sat, to grab a frog based snack from the lawn.

Hopefully you will get the chance during the month to visit the reserve and get close to nature be it reptilian (common lizards are out and about), avian (yellow hammers and skylarks are singing above the reserve supplementing the cuckoo) or enjoying the flora that at least stays still once you locate it.

 

F.B.H.H. Database

Work over the winter has seen many of the historic records of surveys of the reserve added to the F.B.H.H. database. The records are of somewhat varying age and detail but in general they give a comprehensive record of what has been seen and when on the reserve.

Currently, and allowing for some duplication due to species name changes and re -classifications, errors in recording  and simple transcription errors the database contains the following information

Flora – 363 entries

Lichen – 57 entries

Mosses – 71 entries

Fungi – 77 entries

Moths – 104 entries

Butterflies – 36 entries

Molluscs – 31 entries

Spiders – 10 entries

Myripoda – 5 entries

Other insects – 390 entries

Birds – 111 entries

Mammals and Reptiles etc..  Р6 entries (not including humans, dogs or cats!)

So there is plenty to look out for and please do let us know preferably with a photograph attached of anything unusual you see on the reserve so we can add it on to the database.

Also we would welcome hearing from anyone carrying out a survey or maintaining a list of what they see during 2017 so we can update the records with current sighting dates. (Current database indicates Turkey Oak has not been seen on the reserve since 2014 perhaps a slight oversight  they are not that difficult to spot!!!)